Etiket arşivi: Fish

İnanç Dosyası 70 | Christianity 21 Symbols

 

Turkey – Mardin, Deyrulzafaran Monastery (Syrian Orthodox, 4th Century). In 1907 an illustration on a curtain of Christ’s Crucifiction.

Turkey – Mardin, Deyrulzafaran Monastery (Syrian Orthodox, 4th Century). In 1907 an illustration on a curtain of Christ’s Crucifiction.

Many religions use symbols and many of them are common to several religions. SYMBOLS Immediately after the cross, the most widely used Christian symbol is the fish. In ancient Greek, the word ‘fish’ is composed of the initial letters of words meaning Jesus, Son of God, and Saviour in the same language. The New Testament tells how Jesus calls to some fishermen by the Sea of Galilee to follow Him, saying,

“I will make you fishers of men”. Wine made from grapes represents the blood of Christ and bread symbolizes His body. Grapes were also a symbol in the services of Dionysius or Bacchus of the ancient world.

The dove symbolises peace, fertility, purity, love, innocence and the Holy Ghost.

In Taoism, the deer represents long life and good fortune and in Christianity it symbolises eternal life and the soul of one who has drunk from the Fountain of Life and been cured.

In Christianity the cock is the symbol of wakefulness, daybreak and prophecy. The white cock is held to bring good fortune, while the black represents evil. It is believed that the crowing of the cock drives away evil spirits, and for this reason the figure of a cock is placed on the spires of many churches. The cock also plays a part in the Gospel story. Jesus predicted the exact time when the cock would crow, after Peter had denied Him three times.

The peacock symbolizes Doomsday, the Resurrection of Christ and Christ encompassed in radiance. In India and in ancient Greece the peacock is sacred.

In Christianity the lion is the symbol of victory and salvation, the rabbit of sexuality, the devil and magic spells, the palm tree of everlasting life and vital energy, an extension of the Tree of Life of eastern cultures.

In Jewish, Christian and Muslim tradition, the snake epitomizes the Devil and is blamed for the temptation and downfall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Various mythologies are full of different stories of snakes. In the legends of the Sumerians, the Hittites, the Egyptians, the Scandinavians and the Slavs, in ancient Greece and Rome, countless stories about snakes are told.

The pelican is also an important Christian symbol. According to one version of the story it becomes angry with its young, devours them and then regrets its action so much that it tears open its own breast with its beak. The blood then brings the young back to life. This is thought to represent Christ’s sacrifice, when He shed His blood so that all may share in His resurrection, particularly those who drink wine as His blood during the service of Holy Communion.

The banner bearing a red cross on a white ground symbolizes resurrection and is often flown from churches on Sunday. It is also the flag of St. George, patron saint of England.

Cherubim and Seraphim Cherubim, thought of as attending the heavenly throne or guarding especially holy places, are hybrid beings having bird-wings, and human, or animal faces. Cherubim, originating from both early Middle Eastern mythology and iconography carry out important functions as intercessors in the hierarchy of angels. In the Old Testament, cherubim are accorded supernatural agility rather than intercessional propensities, and are thought to have undertaken the duty of upholding the Throne of God. In Christian belief seraphim are regarded as the highest among angels, servants of God in heaven who continually praise him. In Muslim belief, cherubim and seraphim dwell on a level of paradise which Satan cannot penetrate and offer constant prayers of thanks to God.

There is a belief that, while Christ was carrying His cross, Saint Veronica wiped His face with a handkerchief, onto which His features were imprinted, and this handkerchief is held to have healing powers. It is now thought that this mythical Saint’s name was made up of the words Vera Icon (the true name). According to legend, the kerchief found its way to ancient Edessa, now in south-east of Turkey, and there cured King Abgar IV of leprosy. Again, this kerchief is said to have fallen into Balikli pool in Edessa, and on occasion to display the features of Christ in the water. France – St. Theogonnec

There is a belief that, while Christ was carrying His cross, Saint Veronica wiped His face with a handkerchief, onto which His features were imprinted, and this handkerchief is held to have healing powers. It is now thought that this mythical Saint’s name was made up of the words Vera Icon (the true name). According to legend, the kerchief found its way to ancient Edessa, now in south-east of Turkey, and there cured King Abgar IV of leprosy. Again, this kerchief is said to have fallen into Balikli pool in Edessa, and on occasion to display the features of Christ in the water.
France – St. Theogonnec

Spain – Toledo, San Juan de los Reyes Franciscan Monastery, 15th Century.

Spain – Toledo, San Juan de los Reyes Franciscan Monastery, 15th Century.

 

İnanç Dosyası 66 | Christianity 17 Communion

Today, all Christians believe that the sacrament of the Eucharist, the sharing of bread and wine (grape juice for some Protestants), as commanded by Jesus and strengthens the bond with Him, and also with one another. The celebration of the Last Supper, a central act of worship in the Christian Church, is known by various names, such as Holy Communion, The Mass, the Memorial Meal, the Lord’s Supper, the Divine Liturgy, the Blessed Sacrament or simply the Sacrament. Since the earliest days of the Church, this, together with prayer and baptism, has been an indispensable part of Christian worship. Many churches share a belief in the Real Presence of the body of Christ during the celebration of Holy Communion.

In the Roman Catholic Church, the Sacrament of Communion is performed as a series of ceremonies known as the Mass. Music of the Mass is either plainsong or polyphonic. Plainsong, a certain style of unisonal music, comprising Gregorian, which belongs to Rome and Ambrosian, comes from Milan. Many groups of Eastern Church music could also be unisonal. Music is indispensable for the recitation of the Psalms and for the reading of the scriptures in public. With the development of the harmonic concept, plainchant declined. Many famous composers have written music for the liturgy of the Mass, in the form of both unisonal and polyphonic anthems, which later, resembling opera, were composed for orchestra, choir and soloists. While the outward appearance of bread and wine consecrated during Holy Communion does not change in any way, these substances undergo Transubstantiation, and become the body and blood of Christ.

The divergence concerning Holy Communion in the Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches does not reside in the doctrine, but rather in varying forms of worship and rites. In the Roman Catholic Church’s Sacrament, bread alone is offered to the congregation, while in the Orthodox (as in the Protestant Churches), bread and wine are offered together. In the West, unleavened bread is often used on account of the connection between the Passover and the Last Supper, but the Eastern Orthodox Church does not accept this practice because the New Testament does not specify a requirement for unleavened bread, and the consecrated bread is sometimes dipped in the cup of wine. With Orthodox Christians, prayers to the Holy Spirit are an obligatory part of the Communion service. Jean Calvin postulated that in the act of consecration, it was not bread and wine but the real, although spiritual, presence of Christ. In Christian art, the symbol of the sacrament of Communion is the fish, bread and chalice on the table.